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What religion are you currently? And why?
CorDrine Posted: Sat Apr 3 02:08:00 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Just to get to know you all better. What is your current religion? And why is it so? Any reason? Do share.


 
CorDrine Posted: Sat Apr 3 02:09:08 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  And just to add, what if you don't have any official religion, or can't really decide. Does it matter?


 
sweet p Posted: Sat Apr 3 02:26:32 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Sweet P is currently of no denomination...except Skepticism.

Catholic Papa and Evangelist Mama made little confused Sweet P. Neither could agree on baptising me under the other's religion and so left it at that.

I was exposed to several different faiths. My mum took me to catholic church, baptist church, united church, a whole bunch of others and synagogues. She tried to give me some options but still tried to make me believe in god. As I got older, I had too many questions for her and she stopped making me go to church because I talked too much during the sermons. I started to read up on other religions and for a while, I considered buddhism. I realised though that I didn't know enough about anything. I settled for meditating and continuously asking myself questions and forever being in a state of uncertainty.

I plan on being like this for a while.





 
Asswipe Posted: Sat Apr 3 02:29:27 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  i really don't like religions cause they place too much emphasis on getting to heaven and not enough faith in living the good life, while we're here now. so yeah, god sucks and religions suck and i'm an athiest


 
marsteller Posted: Sat Apr 3 02:50:58 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  agnostic like a motherfucker, bitch


 
choke Posted: Sat Apr 3 03:12:22 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  atheist. i dont like the idea of living for something. im just living


 
antartica Posted: Sat Apr 3 03:14:04 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  i beleive in myself, my partner and the Family


 
DaveHill Posted: Sat Apr 3 03:32:52 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  convinced atheist. I am in control, not some fucking entity that can't get its priorities straight.
But if you believe in something, please do. I have a free mind, just as long as you refrain from trying to convert me.


 
libra Posted: Sat Apr 3 03:41:58 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  atheist. I've never had it any other way. I'm happy where I'm at, i don't need the comfort of some religion and i want to live for right now, not for something that may or may not be.

I was put off of religion in a few ways, but i think the biggest part is the fact that my dad grew up catholic, and decided he didn't believe in god at age 13 and was the black sheep of his screwed up family. My mom was never religious, so i was raised in a family that didnt really think or care about god.


 
CorDrine Posted: Sat Apr 3 03:47:26 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  man, looks like most of us here are atheist! Me included, although I do follow the teaching of buddhisme.

So does being an atheist and being a GTer has any connection? Just a thought.


 
choke Posted: Sat Apr 3 03:50:09 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  CorDrine said:
>man, looks like most of us here are atheist! Me included, although I do follow the teaching of buddhisme.
>
>So does being an atheist and being a GTer has any connection? Just a thought.

Yeah we've squashed any hope of reassurance or hope (god included) out of each other :P


 
Puck Posted: Sat Apr 3 04:18:35 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I just don't care. I don't give a shit if some superhero in outer-space made me or not. Organized religion pisses me off.

This is a job for...
THE ANTICHIST!


 
choke Posted: Sat Apr 3 04:24:44 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Puck said:
>I just don't care. I don't give a shit if some superhero in outer-space made me or not. Organized religion pisses me off.
>
>This is a job for...
> THE ANTICHIST!


 
antartica Posted: Sat Apr 3 04:28:24 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  CorDrine said:
>man, looks like most of us here are atheist! Me included, although I do follow the teaching of buddhisme.

actually i was brought up in a Taoist family and then the folks deciced to choose Buddhism so they took classes ad brought me along, and i actually have taken my Buddhist vows and was given a buddhist name and all that... but heck... i've broken all my vows so many times.
>
>So does being an atheist and being a GTer has any connection? Just a thought.

now all i beleive that as long i dun do wrong, i'm cool...


 
choke Posted: Sat Apr 3 04:29:55 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  sorry got a lil confused. What i meant 2 say was.. thats an awesome album :P


 
Dancer Posted: Sat Apr 3 05:21:28 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  me too.. taoism family but i guess there's a close link between buddhism and taoism. i'm not very religious, but i'll say i do pray sometimes.


 
iggy Posted: Sat Apr 3 05:46:29 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  old skool christian. my own mix of gnostic gospels and history and fact rather than the myths.

buddist, taoist and zen philosophies are practiced too.

yeah, i have my own cult and i'm the grand high poobah


 
addi Posted: Sat Apr 3 08:02:40 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  next bible study i have with trog i'm bringing a print out of this page and we're all going to pray for each one of you, one at a time! (we'll have to pray a little harder for chanz being he's a grand poopball and all).
Remember that Jesus loves you, but that if you don't shape up He has no qualms about sending you all to burn in hell for an eternity.
have a good day!

BTW I believe pretty much the same as Sweet P only my beliefs are more right than hers, cuz she's canadian.


 
DanSRose Posted: Sat Apr 3 09:00:52 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Borderline between Judaism and agnosticism, but...
I am lucky enough to have travelled around the world (well, not around but close) and there are somethings I cannot explain or classify as being natural or just a random phenomeneon. So while I put those things under files called X, questions remain how and why these things exists. I have seen prayers been answered, people healed almost instanteously, and been in the pressence of overwhelming bliss in ordinary events, and while I don't quite believe in them, I question them as it is the only thing to do.


 
FN Posted: Sat Apr 3 09:26:11 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Atheist without having a single doubt about it.


 
trogdor57 Posted: Sat Apr 3 09:49:39 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Well, I'm Christian, and incase you couldn't guess, I catch hell for being so open about it. Ah well...


 
FN Posted: Sat Apr 3 10:50:32 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  trogdor57 said:
>Well, I'm Christian, and incase you couldn't guess, I catch hell for being so open about it. Ah well...


You 'catch hell' for changing your story whenever you feel like it and for saying stuff that contradicts itself and sometimes you start talking about stuff you don't seem to know enough about to be able to be so convinced about it


 
iggy Posted: Sat Apr 3 12:32:51 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:

>
>You 'catch hell' for changing your story whenever you feel like it and for saying stuff that contradicts itself and sometimes you start talking about stuff you don't seem to know enough about to be able to be so convinced about it


ha ha ha ha hahahahahhahahahahahhahahhaahahah
hahahha
ha
ha
hahahaha
ha
hahaaha


 
SntSaturn Posted: Sat Apr 3 13:57:43 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I feel like such a minority.

Though not quite as fiery as trogdor, I'm a Christian. Partly, I was raised in a very Christian home. I went to a Christian elementary school, Sunday school, and all that other good stuff. Mostly, I went through a period where I didn't believe. While I was searching for an explanation of why things are, etc. I could come up for no better explanation than that which God provides. And, like Christophe says, a small (very small!) part just likes the idea and comfort of someone watching over me. It's very hard to explain; I just believe.


 
Malik Posted: Sat Apr 3 15:59:18 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I am theistic. That's all I can grant. *begins long-ass narrative*
I was raised Christian, and for some time, was a Trogish fanatic. I lived for Christ, then realized I wasn't really living for Christ (according tot he people at summer camp), then reaffirmed my committment to Christ, and was ON FIRE!

Then I started to get thinking (this was around age 14, 15 or so). I realized that I had never actually talked to God or Jesus or anybody, none of my prayers were being answered, I was going through one of the hardest times in my life, and where was God? Nevertheless, where was my church, my family, the people that cared so much about my soul? Furthermore, I lived in an area where Jesus is "cool", and you can't be in the "in crowd" if you don't go to church on Wed. nights, and then get high and drunk afterwords, made me not want to be considered a "Christian." I would be adament about how I was a Catholic, not a Christian, because Christianity was just a fad where I lived.

And then, I read or thought or heard the idea that if I was born in [nation x], I would, most likely be a [nation x's religion]. This is when I completely broke down my faith, and did a complete rebuild. I read more scripture, more religious books, and did more thinking than I had done in a while. Essentally, I came to the conclusion that there had to be some kind of God, or gods, or Divine Force, or aliens, or whatever. I mean, we're here, aren't we? Then, I couldn't fiat anything else or any other beliefs into existance. All historical texts I considered fallable, as they were written by fallable beings, and subject to deteroriation, biased influence, history, etc, so I couldn't just pick one religion over another.

So I hold to the belief in theism.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Sat Apr 3 20:36:35 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Does anybody think it's interesting that Albert Einstein believed in God and so does Steven Hawking ?


 
choke Posted: Sat Apr 3 21:02:59 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>Does anybody think it's interesting that Albert Einstein believed in God and so does Steven Hawking ?

They must be very disturbed young laddies. Theyd have to keep remaking their faith every step of the way to tie in all the new stuff they discovered wouldnt they? Thatd suck


 
DanSRose Posted: Sun Apr 4 04:09:29 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  In the summer of 2000, I went on a trip to the Holy Land, and at the Western Wall, about 20 feet away from the divider on the men's side, I entered myself into a deep prayer session. Time wasn't an issue because it wasn't- it was a question of Size not time (Read the Size monologue from Stephen King's The Gunslinger- it's on GT). While talking and talking to anyone who would listen (though I was aiming up, towards the Above), I began to receive answers. Though they were non-verbal, actions and signs rather than words and messages, every question I posed was answered. I can't tell what the questions or answers- they are not for you.
To change my previous answer, while I do believe, I don't always worship. I have a strong feeling a Higher Power may exist, I'm not as sure if I feel confident in swearing my alligence to that Power, one that may be faulty and spun from something other the surrounding myths and stories.

Haec credam a deo pio? A deo iusto, a deo scito?


 
iggy Posted: Sun Apr 4 04:57:45 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>Does anybody think it's interesting that Albert Einstein believed in God and so does Steven Hawking ?

science and religion are not at odds
science is simply too young to understand
- dan brown, angels and demons


 
iggy Posted: Sun Apr 4 05:07:47 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>Does anybody think it's interesting that Albert Einstein believed in God and so does Steven Hawking ?

then do u find it interesting that the big bang theory was proposed the big bang theory in 1927?

georges lemaitre, a catholic monk, proposed the big bang theory. scientists claimed that it was impossible.
matter cannot be created out of nothing.
edwin hubble gather information and proved 2 years later that it was scientifically possible.
and that the church claimed victory, saying that the bible was scientifically correct...
that "let there be light" was scientifically correct after all.

albert einstein and stephen hawking are religious because physics is considered by many physicists as God's natural law.
many of the theories the proposed are in fact theo-physics, which are looking for scientific truths with religious overtones. :)



 
mat_j Posted: Sun Apr 4 12:14:05 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I'm what that bloke from the Passion would call a buffet Catholic, now if you dn't mind i'm off to enjoy said buffet.


 
kurohyou Posted: Thu Apr 8 19:34:38 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Raised Jehovah's Witness, didn't make sense so gave up on it when I was about 16, Went to a non-denominational christian church with my wife for a while and didn't enjoy it. I'm now studying buddhism and taoism, and am enjoying buddism quite a bit. Need to find a support system of some sort, my wife doesn't understand it but is still supportive.


 
Mouse Posted: Thu Apr 8 20:37:08 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I was going to pass this thread by but I changed my mind.
My religion is a mix of atheism and Wicca, basically Wicca minus the formal dieties.
Mouse


 
Malik Posted: Fri Apr 9 00:59:21 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Well, to paraphrase Benjamin Franklin, God is a watchmaker. He creates the physical laws of time and space that govern our universe, and puts them into motion. So, it's not contradictory to Science, it just adds on to it.



 
marsteller Posted: Fri Apr 9 01:37:46 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  i like the teachings of most religions way better than the beliefs


 
FN Posted: Fri Apr 9 04:27:24 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Malik said:
>Well, to paraphrase Benjamin Franklin, God is a watchmaker. He creates the physical laws of time and space that govern our universe, and puts them into motion. So, it's not contradictory to Science, it just adds on to it.
>

How would benjamin franklin know.

Did "God" tell him?


 
marsteller Posted: Fri Apr 9 12:56:48 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  http://www.edwindecker.com/sordid/


I s it just me, or are the door-to-door zealots really pushing the God thing lately? I keep getting those horrifying raps on my door:

Knock knock.

I always freeze in terror when I hear that sound. Because I know it can't be a friend. My friends never knock. They just barge in hollering, "Decker!" at the top of their lungs, carrying six-paks and Zigzags, and dragging me out to play disc golf at Morley Field.

When somebody taps on my door, it either means they want me to buy a Kit Kat bar to help save some starving kid in Jungleville, or they want to save my eternal, damnable soul from this wicked life.

Strangely, the Bible-vermin were swarming around about the same time the termites were. Did you notice the termite infestation after our last two Santa Anas? It was eerie. I think the heat chased them out of the woodwork. They were everywhere -- like a scourge. I opened my morning newspaper and three of the little bastards fell out. It was as though God were still punishing San Diego for acquiring Ryan Leaf.

Maybe the heat chased the Bible-bugs out of the woodwork too.

Knock, knock.

See, Jesse Ventura is right about one thing: Religion is for dolts. It's a fantasy, a myth. Old, bearded men parting great seas or sad-eyed, long-haired carpenter boys pulling wine flasks out of their asses at cocktail parties is no less outrageous than Zeus turning himself into a tiger and screwing maidens behind Hera's back.

Religion is humanity's flailing attempt to explain this spectacular world. Religion is a man-made set of morals imposed to keep us from killing each other a lot. Religion is the camouflage for a horrifying thought: After death, there may be nothing. . . not a goddam thing.

But it is not the stupidity of the doorstep Bible-bangers, or that "I've-been-programmed-by-Jesus" haze in their eyes, that infuriates me.

It is the audacity.

Only a megalomaniac could justify wasting our time with this brimstone bramble. Okay, sure -- it's a small intrusion, hardly worthy of installing that electrified doorknocker they're selling at Home Depot. I can just pretend not to be home and they go away, no harm done, right?

Wrong. This unsavory intrusion is symbolic of a graver, more devastating desecration upon good persons. When I hear that knock on my door, what I hear is the incessant, oppressive, religious fervor that has been pounding on the front door of mankind and dragging people away since the very first front door was constructed.

Knock knock.

How small an intrusion was it when a Jew heard knock knock in Germany, circa 1939? Nothing good can come from a harsh rap on your tranquility.

Sometimes I like to open the door and have a chat. Maybe because Bible-babe is batting her eyelashes through the peephole; maybe because I want to be the bird that snatches these Bible termites out of the air; or maybe because, deep inside of me, also, is the seed of tyranny and I want to convert them to my way of thinking.

It's then that I like to unveil. . . The Paradox.

The Paradox begins with the premise that -- as most Bible-mongers believe -- God is all-powerful. He is the smartest, grooviest, hippest, sexiest, strongest, quickest, flyest Dude around. He makes a mean guacamole, pours the perfect drink, has the best vinyl collection, shags the hottest chicks, and plays the rippingest drumroll since the Big Bang.

So, if God can do anything, can He make a rock so big that even He can't lift it?

The first part is a no-brainer. If He can't make a rock He can't lift then He obviously can't do everything. But if God can make a rock so big He can't lift it, then before Him lies a rock He can't budge.

Conclusion: He cannot do everything.

You know how the blabbering Bible-Brahmans almost always respond to the paradox? They say, "Well, He would make a rock so big He can't lift it -- then, when it's time to lift it, He’d change it back to a rock He can lift."

Oh, OK -- so now Merlin is in charge of the universe? Please. Would you listen to yourselves? You’re making this shit up as you go along. If He ever lifts that rock then He failed to make a rock He couldn't lift -- and that means He can't do everything. Period.

I love watching as The Paradox careens around in their brainpans, like a ricocheting bullet. I like to imagine their heads exploding right there on my front step -- the stunned, headless body of God's vacuum-cleaner salesmen crumples backwards onto the front lawn and becomes crabgrass fodder.


Knock knock that, asshole.


 
DanSRose Posted: Sat Apr 10 20:34:25 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Christophe said:
>How would benjamin franklin know.
>
>Did "God" tell him?

Cyncisim is healthy, is good, is necessary for survival as an individual. To question the "Given" is to let yourself live to the next day, and the after that, and the one after that...
Like everything, too much of it is suicide. To question the existence and importance of everything, always, leads down the road of self-destruction. When the basics and the necessaties are denied, the needed and obvious are cast off.
Belief, whether it is small or undoubting, is accepting that at the present moment some knowledge is beyond you. It becomes a question of how much you are willing to let into yourself.
I lived scoffing at others until I could not believe the reality that was in front of me. And then, then, I came across something I could not explain away with reason or science. Early I said I've stood witness to a voodoun ceremony in Brooklyn, NY. I cannot explain what I saw there- personality changes, dervish mentality that led to communion with snakes, flaming body parts and piercing organs without leaving a mark. It's pagan, alien, bizzare, and beyond my explanation through any of forensic science I have (and I know quite a bit).
Don't state a claim in a camp where the nature of the question is beyond the language of explanation. Benajamin Franklin's explanation for his understanding for the Almighty did not come from "God"- he answered in his own words. Or, look at it as a tool for understanding the human condition. It's a condition that bites back when laughed at.


 
DanSRose Posted: Sat Apr 10 20:35:44 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  marsteller said:
>Knock knock that, asshole.

It's the question of going Higher, as a human. Asshole.
(not you marstellar. The author of that)


 
Mesh Posted: Tue May 25 07:25:45 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  born evangelical-Lutheran.


very interested in wodanism/odinism.


 
Mesh Posted: Tue May 25 07:27:06 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addison said:

>BTW I believe pretty much the same as Sweet P only my beliefs are more right than hers, cuz she's canadian.



hahahahah thats funny, because its true!!!!


 
thedissociate Posted: Wed Aug 18 03:32:52 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I've always thought that it would be better to have no religion- to be an atheist, like many of you. I thought life would be so much simpler that way.
I still do believe that, but I don't act so "high and mighty" about it and I don't claim to be an atheist when asked.
After studying religion at school I've found that all the major religions have aspects that I do like. For example, Buddhism, and the way that Buddhists live their lives with a kind and peaceful attitude towards everything in nature, and generally stick by these beliefs moreso than other religions, some who contradict their own beliefs, becoming hypocrits.
I try not to act so "proud" about what I believe in anymore, because frankly, I'm not so sure about what I believe in now.
I don't like religion because of the conflict it can create between people, but I do like it because of the fact that sometimes, for many people, religion can fill a void in their lives and can make some people feel less worthless. It gives them hope.


 
iggy Posted: Wed Aug 18 06:41:50 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Marlboro Lights

All hail the sacred smoke


 
Mesh Posted: Wed Aug 18 06:43:31 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Which reminds me, I am a dirty scowndrel :(

I worshipped Marlboro reds today...




 
iggy Posted: Wed Aug 18 06:48:20 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  that and beer.
and the occasional jack.

i worship the pristine butt of momo... but that's another story altogether.


shush we shouldn't speak of that...

dammit dammit

i expect her to storm into the office and strangle me for that quip.



 
antartica Posted: Wed Aug 18 07:31:54 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  the mighty red
for where would i
be sans your guiding
mist and haze
each morn i wake
to balls of tar and
phlegm so grey
and yet the first
act of day
i reach for you
in your temple
white and red
a flame i bring
and offer you life
and as my eyes
still lined with crud
and throat so dry
gets feel of life
from your body so
frail and white
your life will flow
my lungs into
*H.A.C.K... koff koff*
dammit another tar ball...
an i got ash on my pillow... fuck


lol... ok i was real bored
so shoot me


 
FN Posted: Wed Aug 18 09:01:15 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  DanSRose said:
>Cyncisim is healthy, is good, is necessary for survival as an individual.

Hurrah for cynicism.

>Like everything, too much of it is suicide.

No it doesn't. I'm sill here, am I not, with no intention of ending things.

>Belief, whether it is small or undoubting, is accepting that at the present moment some knowledge is beyond you.

Yeah fair enough, so just leave it at that instead of making stuff up like religion in order to give some sort of meaning to your life or whatever.

>It's pagan, alien, bizzare, and beyond my explanation through any of forensic science I have (and I know quite a bit).

Yeah, that's all very nice. It's called mass hysteria and induced group behaviour.

>Don't state a claim in a camp where the nature of the question is beyond the language of explanation.

Yeah, I bet only god can do that, right?

Why do the religious types urge to keep people dumb by telling them not even to try and think about it because it can't ever be explained, but hey, god is love and god exist, period.


 
Nikki Posted: Wed Aug 18 10:32:26 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  :-)


 
jennemmer Posted: Wed Aug 18 17:44:10 2004 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Hahaha, I read all the following and have to jump in:

"Does anybody think it's interesting that Albert Einstein believed in God and so does Steven Hawking ?

science and religion are not at odds
science is simply too young to understand
- dan brown, angels and demons

albert einstein and stephen hawking are religious because physics is considered by many physicists as God's natural law.
many of the theories the proposed are in fact theo-physics, which are looking for scientific truths with religious overtones. :)"

I would also call myself a theist. I don't hold to any formal doctrine and take a much more natural/scientific view point.

Physics by its nature puts people in an interesting spot theologically. It holds fast to the Big Bang thoery and so evolution of the universe and everything in it is a given. But as to what caused this 'bang' we can only begin to speculate. Also, there are so many handy coincidences along the path of the universe's history. Every element in the universe has been created from Hydrogen in stars since the big bang. It's easy to make the smallest elements, but Carbon, one of the most inportant elements (at least to us Carbon based lifeforms) is almost impossible to make.

* Warning... Jenn is going off on another science tangent* feel free to skip this paragraph ;) *
Most elements are created by a chance collision with a minimum amount of energy in the middle of a star. This is a slow enough process (not even 1% of the hydrogen in the sun is turned into helium and it still burns). Carbon requires a two particles to collide and stick together (this only lasts nanoseconds) and while these two are still bound a third particle needs to hit as well. If the lengh of time was any shorter nothing above Carbon would exist. If it was any shorter elements would be created a lot faster and we wouldn't have many of the lower level elements left which we need as well.

That's not explained as well as i could be, but knowing what I do I find it hard NOT to believe in some sort of higher power, I don't know about the granting personal wishes in the form of prayers and stuff, but I do believe that there is something guiding evolution towards sentience. What the point of creating any work of art without anyone to appreciate it ;)


 



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