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Won't you help me?
ehwazingwaz Posted: Tue Nov 24 12:37:20 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  This is for my Folklore class, so any and all input is appreciated!!!

1. What is your favorite food?
2. What is your favorite holiday dish?
3. What foods/recipes are/have been passed down through your family members?
4. What is your ethnic background (meaning where did your ancestors originate from?)
5. Why is food important to you (besides for survival)?
6. Do you know how to cook? Who taught you?
7. What are the food traditions in your family?
8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?
9. Is there a certain dish that is made differently depending on which family member makes it?


any recipes you're willing to share would also be very helpful.


 
Puck Posted: Tue Nov 24 16:12:30 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Sorry, but mine is going to suck.

>1. What is your favorite food?
Based on frequency, it's pizza.

>2. What is your favorite holiday dish?
Holidays are wasted on me. I'm a mashed potatoes and corn guy. I only started eating ham and turkey at family gatherings within the last 6 years. "Salads" never looked appealing to me and my mother has only recently started cooking real food, now that I'm 4 years out of the house.

>3. What foods/recipes are/have been passed down through your family members?
The one on the back of the pumpkin can or bag or chocolate chips. I think there's a hidden recipe box floating around, but I never looked in it.

>4. What is your ethnic background (meaning where did your ancestors originate from?)
Cherokee, Choctaw (I think...), Irish, Scottish, Swedish, (other various western european bits)
>5. Why is food important to you (besides for survival)?
When I'm actually making myself something, I try to put some safe creativity into it so that if it turns out to be freaking awesome, then I can either share it or the idea with anyone who I suspect might also dig it.

>6. Do you know how to cook? Who taught you?
That's kind of a trick question. I can dirty all my pots and pans while making food. I don't own a microwave and I don't eat ramen all the time. I suppose I know how to cook.
Nobody in particular taught me. I'll either observe and mimick, look things up online, or read the package if it has directions on it.

>7. What are the food traditions in your family?
Cheap.

>8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?
Recipe? I just throw stuff together unless I'm baking.

>9. Is there a certain dish that is made differently depending on which family member makes it?
my grandmother microwaves pizza rolls like nobody's business! Not really. But seriously, the last few holidays that I actually went to her house, that was the main source of snackage.

>share
Tomorrow night's foodings:
canned tomato bisque
veggies of choice - green peas, black beans, diced carrots, diced potatoes
2 tablespoons habanero salsa
desired seasoning - Black White and Pink pepper, basil, a buttload of garlic
protein - Quorn bits or just sauteed mushrooms
Cheez-Its and/or cheese chunks, cuz why not?!

butternut squash soup sprinkled with cinnamon and a little white pepper. Served with graham crackers


 
addi Posted: Tue Nov 24 17:18:33 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I HATE filling these out, but because it's for school and you're nice, waz, I'll do it.

>1. What is your favorite food?
Probably go with a grilled fillet mignon, but if I answered this another day I could easily write Mexican food, or Italian food.

>2. What is your favorite holiday dish?
candied yams

>3. What foods/recipes are/have been passed down through your family members?

Felix's Mish Mush (cooked spaghetti noodles, put in a frying pan with eggs, butter, Parmesan cheese, chives and bacon bits and mixed all together). Cheap and pretty tasty.

>4. What is your ethnic background (meaning where did your ancestors originate from?)
Mixed bag here. Mom: Norwegian/Danish. Dad: English/German

>5. Why is food important to you (besides for survival)?

I'm frequent told it's not important enough to me...that I don't appreciate it enough. I guess because it promotes good happy conversation with friends and family forced to sit together when eating. That, and when I'm busy eating I'm not thinking about sex, so that's good.

>6. Do you know how to cook? Who taught you?

Watching my mother and learning from camping all the time with my father. Out of necessity I was self taught living on my own as a college student, way back when.

>7. What are the food traditions in your family?

Nothing exotic with my family. Basic meat and potato fare, being from the midwest. Any vegetable outside of corn was considered exotic.

>8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?

I suppose 3 or 4 different recipes using eggs as the base.

>9. Is there a certain dish that is made differently depending on which family member makes it?

Yes. My wife makes macaroni and cheese differently than I do (mine is much better).

>any recipes you're willing to share would also be very helpful.

Sorry, don't have the time now to write in a recipe. Perhaps later...if you bribe me.


 
Puck Posted: Tue Nov 24 17:49:06 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>Any vegetable outside of corn was considered exotic.
I totally relate.

>Sorry, don't have the time now to write in a recipe. Perhaps later...if you bribe me.

TITTIES!


 
addi Posted: Tue Nov 24 17:56:02 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Puck said:

>TITTIES!

lol!
Puck, a man after my own tit...heart.


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Tue Nov 24 18:30:05 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>Puck said:
>
>>TITTIES!
>
>lol!
>Puck, a man after my own tit...heart.


i've got those!


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Tue Nov 24 18:33:24 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>I HATE filling these out, but because it's for school and you're nice, waz, I'll do it.

thank you! it is much appreciated!

>>candied yams

can i know more?


>>8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?
>
>I suppose 3 or 4 different recipes using eggs as the base.

ooo, what are they? also, how can i bribe you?

>
>>9. Is there a certain dish that is made differently depending on which family member makes it?
>
>Yes. My wife makes macaroni and cheese differently than I do (mine is much better).

i'd love to know about these too... please? :->


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Tue Nov 24 18:38:11 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  >Puck said:

> Quorn bits

what?

>
>butternut squash soup sprinkled with cinnamon and a little white pepper. Served with graham crackers

this sounds tasty. :-)


 
Puck Posted: Tue Nov 24 18:44:05 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
> Quorn bits ?
Quorn is a brand name of faux meat made from mushrooms. I prefer the breaded patties and the "tenders" (chunked). It'll be in the frozen section. Whole Foods seems to carry it regularly.

>TASTY
WORD!


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Tue Nov 24 19:29:28 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Puck said:
>ehwazingwaz said:
>> Quorn bits ?
>Quorn is a brand name of faux meat made from mushrooms. I prefer the breaded patties and the "tenders" (chunked). It'll be in the frozen section. Whole Foods seems to carry it regularly.

faux meat... this is a strange concept for a farm girl to embrace... yet perhaps it is manageable. what does it taste like? or do they have imitation chicken, beef, veal, lamb, duck, etc?





 
libra Posted: Tue Nov 24 21:20:52 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>This is for my Folklore class, so any and all input is appreciated!!!
>
>1. What is your favorite food?

Chocolate.
Real food? Sea Bass with Black Bean Edamame sauce from my favorite restaurant.

>2. What is your favorite holiday dish?

I don't like Turkey, ham, etc, at all really, and definitely not those other weird things you eat on thanksgiving.
I don't mind mashed potatoes.
Dessert is the best part.

>3. What foods/recipes are/have been passed down through your family members?

My mom's spaghetti, my grandmother's chocolate syrup.

>4. What is your ethnic background (meaning where did your ancestors originate from?)

Norway, Spain, England, Italy, Ireland, Mexico, etc, etc.

>5. Why is food important to you (besides for survival)?

It brings people together. It maintains and contains memories.

>6. Do you know how to cook? Who taught you?

I know enough for now, and I like to experiment. I mostly taught myself. My parents aren't all that great at cooking.

>7. What are the food traditions in your family?

Certain dishes cooked by certain people for the holidays. (My aunt's cheesecake, my grandmother's gravy). And my grandmother always brings all the kids a see's candy chocolate turkey or santa or rabbit, depending on the holiday.

>8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?

Umm...I don't know...maybe about three on average (for fish, chicken, etc).

>9. Is there a certain dish that is made differently depending on which family member makes it?

Yes. My fajitas are sooo much better than my mom's. I'm also not allowed (by my boyfriend) to put onions in the spaghetti sauce. My mom's chocolate syrup tends to be more bitter tasting than my grandmother's.



 
Posted: Tue Nov 24 23:12:39 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>This is for my Folklore class, so any and all input is appreciated!!!
>
>1. What is your favorite food?
Steak! Medium/Medium Rare

>2. What is your favorite holiday dish?
Pumpkin Pie

>3. What foods/recipes are/have been passed down through your family members?
Poutine!

>4. What is your ethnic background (meaning where did your ancestors originate from?)
French/Irish Canadians

>5. Why is food important to you (besides for survival)?
Each generation of our family has been a group of shittier cooks than the last. Eating better necessitates socializing with the old folks. It's a nice setup.

>6. Do you know how to cook? Who taught you?
Not very well! I make a lot of sandwiches.

>7. What are the food traditions in your family?
Eat everything on your plate b/c there are starving kids who'd kill for those beans, Phil.

>8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?
I can do a lot with cashews and chicken.


>9. Is there a certain dish that is made differently depending on which family member makes it?
At family gatherings, my old man takes a painstaking amount of time to ask every family member how they'd like their steak cooked, and then he must decide 'fuck it', because everybody winds up with their stakes Well Done.




 
Puck Posted: Wed Nov 25 00:31:47 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>what does it taste like? or do they have imitation chicken, beef, veal, lamb, duck, etc?
Well, like meat, they don't have much default flavor, unless they're the patties, which have various flavor styles. There are chicken-style ones, and hamburgery ones that I don't bother with because when I want a burger, I get a dang burger! Sloppy and juicy, oh yeah!


 
addi Posted: Wed Nov 25 07:56:05 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>>>candied yams

>can i know more?
Yes you can know more, Ma'am. Go to Google search, type in "Candied Yams", press enter, and you'll learn more about that dish than is good for you.


>>>8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?
>>
>>I suppose 3 or 4 different recipes using eggs as the base.
>
>ooo, what are they?

Scrambled, poached, fried, and hard boiled. : ) lol! (sorry)

>also, how can i bribe you?

A sure sign you're new here, waz. The other plinkers (females) here know that's a very dangerous question to ask me. ; )

>>>9. Is there a certain dish that is made differently depending on which family member makes it?
>>
>>Yes. My wife makes macaroni and cheese differently than I do (mine is much better).
>
>i'd love to know about these too... please? :->

She's German so she adds sour kraut to everything.

Mine is made with elbow noodles, cheese (Velveeta usually), cream, unsalted real butter, salt and pepper, and a copious amount of love. : )


 
Mark Posted: Wed Nov 25 08:31:34 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>This is for my Folklore class, so any and all input is appreciated!!!
>
>1. What is your favorite food?
A good steak, medium done

>2. What is your favorite holiday dish?
None in particular

>3. What foods/recipes are/have been passed down through your family members?
None

>4. What is your ethnic background (meaning where did your ancestors originate from?)
the Netherlands. I'm probable as Dutch as you can get :)

>5. Why is food important to you (besides for survival)?
Since I'm always hungry ;) And I like to eat (home made) delicious food.

>6. Do you know how to cook? Who taught you?
Yes. Mostly self learned. Sometimes I asked my parents for help, plus I learned a few recipies from friends.

>7. What are the food traditions in your family?
There are none.

>8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?
Too many :) Chicken is the most versatile piece of meat ;) And I always like to try out something new.

>9. Is there a certain dish that is made differently depending on which family member makes it?
We all cook everything in a different way actually.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Wed Nov 25 11:38:04 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Velveeta isn't cheese.


 
addi Posted: Wed Nov 25 12:50:42 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>Velveeta isn't cheese.

It is if you close your eyes and believe its cheese.


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Wed Nov 25 13:08:49 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>ifihadahif said:
>>Velveeta isn't cheese.
>
>It is if you close your eyes and believe its cheese.

this is how we do it!


 
ifihadahif Posted: Wed Nov 25 21:43:33 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>ifihadahif said:
>>Velveeta isn't cheese.
>
>It is if you close your eyes and believe its cheese.
>
I will concede that it is cheesey at best.
I use it too, because it melts better than real cheese.
It's a pain in the ass using real cheese to make mac and cheese with. I only do it that way once in a great while.


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Thu Nov 26 12:13:01 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>addi said:
>>ifihadahif said:
>It's a pain in the ass using real cheese to make mac and cheese with. I only do it that way once in a great while.


try fresh mozzarella. i found it at walmart once. and bowties instead of elbow. and i think cream of mushroom but i could be wrong on that one. also, velveeta crumbles and italian bread crumbs on top.. bake in oven for a while... very tasty. if i can find this recipe i'll post it. :-)


 
Puck Posted: Thu Nov 26 14:15:46 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I would try rotini with pepperjack and provolone. maybe 1/3 provolone.


 
Ahriman Posted: Sat Nov 28 17:29:50 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>This is for my Folklore class, so any and all input is appreciated!!!
>
>1. What is your favorite food?
Fresh fruit

>2. What is your favorite holiday dish?
Corned Beef and Cabbage with plenty of Beer (St. Patrick's Day)

>3. What foods/recipes are/have been passed down through your family members?
Many stews, pierogies, some pies and beer.

>4. What is your ethnic background (meaning where did your ancestors originate from?)
Mostly Irish, Six Mile Bridge, Clare.
Some Sicilian from my mom.

>5. Why is food important to you (besides for survival)?
It's my career and on my brain most of the day. It brings together friends and family. Food also allows me to travel and work anywhere in the world and connect with people on a basic level.

>6. Do you know how to cook? Who taught you?
Yep. Many people. Chefs, grandmas, friends, nature, everyone and everything has something to offer. Just listen.

>7. What are the food traditions in your family?
Eat, drink, be merry. Not necessarily in that order.

>8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?
Haha, a lot. I know how to cook Salmon 100+ ways. I settled on one being the best ;)

>9. Is there a certain dish that is made differently depending on which family member makes it?
Of course, everyone puts in their own flair.

>any recipes you're willing to share would also be very helpful.

What are you looking to cook?


 
choke Posted: Sun Nov 29 06:34:27 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>This is for my Folklore class, so any and all input is appreciated!!!
>
>1. What is your favorite food?

Pasta


>2. What is your favorite holiday dish?

Wine


>3. What foods/recipes are/have been passed down through your family members?

Macaroni cheese


>4. What is your ethnic background (meaning where did your ancestors originate from?)

Ireland


>5. Why is food important to you (besides for survival)?

Makes you sleepy :)


>6. Do you know how to cook? Who taught you?

I am a horrid cook. My sister taught me to make toasted sandwiches last year. I was 20.


>7. What are the food traditions in your family?

My family is vegetarian. So, vegetable slop. If you are to cook meat, we have separate pans etc. Not for religious reasons just the way it's always been.

(My older sister and I eat meat since moving out of home)


>8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?

I don't know any recipes


>9. Is there a certain dish that is made differently depending on which family member makes it?
>
My mother puts indian spices in everything.
My father likes plain vegetable food
My older sister puts cheese on EVERYTHING.
Younger siblings generally eat 2min noodles


>any recipes you're willing to share would also be very helpful.


 
choke Posted: Sun Nov 29 06:39:14 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  wait WAIT I changed my mind

My favourite food is salmon.




 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Sun Nov 29 20:04:08 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  CriminalSaint said:
>ehwazingwaz said:

>>2. What is your favorite holiday dish?
>Pumpkin Pie


i make a really mean pumpkin pie.


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Sun Nov 29 20:08:06 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  addi said:
>ehwazingwaz said:
>>>>candied yams
>
>>can i know more?
>Yes you can know more, Ma'am. Go to Google search, type in "Candied Yams", press enter, and you'll learn more about that dish than is good for you.

:-p i meant, do you have your own special way of making them?

>
>
>>>>8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?
>>>
>>>I suppose 3 or 4 different recipes using eggs as the base.
>>
>>ooo, what are they?
>
>Scrambled, poached, fried, and hard boiled. : ) lol! (sorry)

ROFL

>
>>also, how can i bribe you?
>
>A sure sign you're new here, waz. The other plinkers (females) here know that's a very dangerous question to ask me. ; )

i live for danger! and i suppose i haven't really showed anyone here my wild side yet either... ;-)


i have never been a fan of kraut.


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Sun Nov 29 20:14:12 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Ahriman said:
>
>>3. What foods/recipes are/have been passed down through your family members?
>Many stews, pierogies, some pies and beer.

i love pierogies. the first ones i had i got from a market in cleveland (i forget the name of it) but they were authentic. now i have to settle for the kind i can get from the frozen food section of the grocery store. i'd love to know how to make them by hand myself, cuz that would be awesome. and i'm a big fan of stews and pies as well. share?

>
>>5. Why is food important to you (besides for survival)?
>It's my career

how did you get started? i'd like to make food my career as well.


>>8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?
>Haha, a lot. I know how to cook Salmon 100+ ways. I settled on one being the best ;)

and which way is the best way? perhaps i should try it since i am picky about salmon.

>
>What are you looking to cook?

everything! anything! whatever you want to share with me.


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Sun Nov 29 20:18:25 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>Ahriman said:

>
>>
>>What are you looking to cook?
>
>everything! anything! whatever you want to share with me.


i am a sponge that dives into the sea of good food and delicious desserts; and i don't care that i'm being gluttonous with recipes, because i end up sharing what i've made (that i picked up in the sea of good food in the first place).


 
Puck Posted: Sun Nov 29 20:51:52 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>i live for danger! and i suppose i haven't really showed anyone here my wild side yet either... ;-)
Yeah! Show me some misspelled words, baby!

>i have never been a fan of kraut.

racist...


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Sun Nov 29 20:57:18 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Puck said:
>ehwazingwaz said:
>>i live for danger! and i suppose i haven't really showed anyone here my wild side yet either... ;-)
>Yeah! Show me some misspelled words, baby!
>

never! :-p


>>i have never been a fan of kraut.
>
>racist...

against my own people? yeah, maybe a little bit.





 
Puck Posted: Sun Nov 29 21:13:16 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>never! :-p

Maybe just a peek at your allcaps?

>against my own people? yeah, maybe a little bit.

in looking for a food-based defense of the german people, I now want to go to the sausage shop down the street.

I keep trying to ease meat out of my diet, but I keep getting cravings for burgers and sausage.


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Sun Nov 29 22:22:42 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Puck said:
>ehwazingwaz said:
>>never! :-p
>
>Maybe just a peek at your allcaps?

I SAID NO!

oh god... what have i done?

>
>>against my own people? yeah, maybe a little bit.
>
>in looking for a food-based defense of the german people, I now want to go to the sausage shop down the street.
>
>I keep trying to ease meat out of my diet, but I keep getting cravings for burgers and sausage.

i have to be careful about sausage/bratwurst in particular, since a specific camping trip with a friend let to him cooking in the dark...and not getting everything cooked all the way. the ends of the brats were fine... but the middle was still breathing.


 
Puck Posted: Sun Nov 29 22:39:02 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>I SAID NO!
>oh god... what have i done?
WIN

>cooking in the dark
How does that even work? what sort of camping was this that you were cooking in the dark, because fires usually create light.



 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Sun Nov 29 22:51:08 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Puck said:
>ehwazingwaz said:
>>I SAID NO!
>>oh god... what have i done?
>WIN
>
>>cooking in the dark
>How does that even work? what sort of camping was this that you were cooking in the dark, because fires usually create light.
>

we were in the woods, us three, and my friend got started late. it was *really* dark, and our fire was small also. all the tinder we were using was just a hair too damp to actually catch, so we ended up smothering most of our cooking power.


 
Kira Posted: Sun Nov 29 23:01:59 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>1. What is your favorite food?

Key lime pie. Very tasty but I mainly like it for the memories I associate with this particular food. Must have plenty of whipped cream.

>2. What is your favorite holiday dish?

Turkey? I guess? Fried turkey, yum.

>3. What foods/recipes are/have been passed down through your family members?

None that I know of. Unless you count snow cream. My mother taught herself to cook, and dad makes up scary spicy dishes now and then. So no passing-down of family recipes for THEM, but I do intend to learn my mother's recipes for spaghetti sauce and ginger chicken... eventually.

>4. What is your ethnic background (meaning where did your ancestors originate from?)

Western European, with the usual smattering of native- and/or african-american present in any 'white' family that's lived in the United States for many generations.

>5. Why is food important to you (besides for survival)?

Something to share with others. Both in the preparing and consuming.

>6. Do you know how to cook? Who taught you?

I know enough to get by. My mother taught me how to measure ingredients and so on when I was young, and how to experiment instead of always adhering to the cookbook. I think my sister had some influence on me in that area as well.

>7. What are the food traditions in your family?

Traditions? Erm... 'Help if you can, if not, GET OUT.' And, 'This is what I'm making. If you don't like it, cook for yourself.'

>8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?

Everything I cook is a little different every time a make it. That's not the same as having different recipes, though.

>9. Is there a certain dish that is made differently depending on which family member makes it?

Scrambled eggs is the only thing everyone in the family can and will cook and the only dish we are all willing to eat another person's version of. And yes, we all cook it differently.


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Mon Nov 30 01:24:01 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Kira said:
> Unless you count snow cream.


what is that?e


 
ifihadahif Posted: Mon Nov 30 16:28:57 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>Kira said:
>> Unless you count snow cream.
>
>
>what is that?e
>
You've never heard of snow cream ?

You just take some clean fresh snow, and add a little milk, sugar, and vanilla and you've got snow cream.
Something very similar to ice milk only cheaper and usually tastier.
Side effects include extremely brutal brain freeze.


 
Kira Posted: Mon Nov 30 16:36:16 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>Kira said:
>> Unless you count snow cream.
>
>
>what is that?e

Tasty winter treat my mom learned to make from her parents. Collect a big bowl of clean snow and add a splash of milk, a dash of sugar, and a spoonful or two vanilla extract.

I suppose it would be easier to get out a carton of ice cream, but not as charming and fun.


 
Kira Posted: Mon Nov 30 16:39:54 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  LOL, posted a whole eight minutes after Hif's explanation! Oops.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Mon Nov 30 19:29:48 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Kira said:
>LOL, posted a whole eight minutes after Hif's explanation! Oops.
>
:-)


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Tue Dec 1 00:58:19 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>ehwazingwaz said:
>>Kira said:
>>> Unless you count snow cream.
>>
>>
>>what is that?e
>>
>You've never heard of snow cream ?
>
>You just take some clean fresh snow, and add a little milk, sugar, and vanilla and you've got snow cream.
>Something very similar to ice milk only cheaper and usually tastier.
>Side effects include extremely brutal brain freeze.


i have not in fact, heard of this before. maybe kansas just missed out on the memo. i'll definitely be passing this on to my professor. :)


 
ifihadahif Posted: Tue Dec 1 02:50:46 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>ifihadahif said:
>>ehwazingwaz said:
>>>Kira said:
>>>> Unless you count snow cream.
>>>
>>>
>>>what is that?e
>>>
>>You've never heard of snow cream ?
>>
>>You just take some clean fresh snow, and add a little milk, sugar, and vanilla and you've got snow cream.
>>Something very similar to ice milk only cheaper and usually tastier.
>>Side effects include extremely brutal brain freeze.
>
>
>i have not in fact, heard of this before. maybe kansas just missed out on the memo. i'll definitely be passing this on to my professor. :)
>
Do you think that your perfesser likes snow cream ?


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Tue Dec 1 11:28:07 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ifihadahif said:
>>
>>i have not in fact, heard of this before. maybe kansas just missed out on the memo. i'll definitely be passing this on to my professor. :)
>>
>Do you think that your perfesser likes snow cream ?

I have no idea really, but he's kinda crazy for new stuff.


 
ifihadahif Posted: Tue Dec 1 20:36:49 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Can't wait to try these !

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1230187/New-Sugardrop-tomato-sweeter-peach.html


 
mat_j Posted: Wed Dec 2 08:34:43 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  ehwazingwaz said:
>This is for my Folklore class, so any and all input is appreciated!!!
>

Amazing thread Waz, i love it!

>1. What is your favorite food?

I guess a huge Roast beef dinner, with potatoes (mashed/roasted), carrots, peas, green beans, cabbage, and swede with some gravy and yorkshire puddings.

>2. What is your favorite holiday dish?

Take the above and switch the beef for turkey and the yorkies for cranberry sauce.

>3. What foods/recipes are/have been passed down through your family members?

Haha, I can only think of celtic recipes, starting to feel like i'm stereotyping myself!

Welsh cakes made on a traditional bake stone.

Cawl

Corned Beef Hash


>4. What is your ethnic background (meaning where did your ancestors originate from?)

How far back do we want to Go, welsh and English mainly, family has strains of Ireland and Italy in it though, my surname name is Viking.

>5. Why is food important to you (besides for survival)?

It's the easiest and most rewarding thing i can do for another person.

>6. Do you know how to cook? Who taught you?

I guess so, i'm learning all the time, my mother, fathers, aunties and grandmother mainly also my housemates, the TV, my brother in law....

My housmate Seb is an amazing chef can make pork that'll make you weep tender tears of love that anything can taste so good. He also taught me about using anchovies to flavour lamb which i am very greatful for.

>7. What are the food traditions in your family?

Sunday lunches, extensive pie and pudding making skills, we're winter cooks, which is good for a country that sees as much cold as mine.

>8. How many different recipes do you have/know for one kind of food?

I think the winner has to be the humble hen and her eggs

eggs especially- omlettes, scrambled, fried, poached, in cakes, home made burgers in sandwiches, scotched and many more besides.

>9. Is there a certain dish that is made differently depending on which family member makes it?
>
Pasta dishes, my mother, my sister and i all have different opinions on how pasta should be, though Carly is a lot closer to me. My mothe is a lot less experimental with pasta dishes than Carly or me but she does make the best bolognaise (though with my recent additions to my recipe i might have caught up with her).
>
>any recipes you're willing to share would also be very helpful.

Hmmmm

-Welsh cakes
(I lifted this off the BBC site as it would take too long to type, i love these addictive little buggers)

Ingredients
225g/8oz self-raising flour, sieved
110g/4oz (preferably Welsh) salted butter
1 egg
handful of sultanas
milk, if needed
85g/3oz caster sugar
extra butter, for greasing

Method
1. Rub the fat into the sieved flour to make breadcrumbs. Add the sugar, dried fruit and then the egg. Mix to combine, then form a ball of dough, using a splash of milk if needed.
2. Roll out the pastry until it is a 5mm/žin thick and cut into rounds with a 7.5-10cm/3-4in fluted cutter.
3. You now need a bakestone or a heavy iron griddle. Rub it with butter and wipe the excess away. Put it on to a direct heat and wait until it heats up, place the Welsh cakes on the griddle, turning once. They need about 2-3 minutes each side. Each side needs to be caramel brown before turning although some people I know like them almost burnt.
4. Remove from the pan and dust with caster sugar while still warm. Some people leave out the dried fruit, and split them when cool and sandwich them together with jam.



-Basic all uses tomato sauce: Get a good thick flat bottomed frying pan, add a coating of olive oil, fry garlic until brown on a high heat but do not allow to burn, add a can or two of plum tomatoes chopped up (don't use the ready chopped canned tomoatoes they're not as good), add a teaspoon of salt and a teaspoon of sugar, stir in and simmer and reduce.



-microwave bacon- Put bacon in the microwave for a minute and 10 seconds, it comes out perfect ;-)


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Fri Dec 4 18:23:06 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  mat_j said:
>ehwazingwaz said:
>>This is for my Folklore class, so any and all input is appreciated!!!
>>
>
>Amazing thread Waz, i love it!

:-D thanks!

>
>>1. What is your favorite food?
>
>and swede with some gravy and yorkshire puddings.

what is swede and yorkshire puddings? recipe/basic examples? Any family secrets you're willing to share?

>>3. What foods/recipes are/have been passed down through your family members?
>
>Haha, I can only think of celtic recipes,

that is quite alright! do share!

>Welsh cakes made on a traditional bake stone.

tell me more? (i feel so demanding)

>
>Cawl

say what?


>My housmate Seb is an amazing chef can make pork that'll make you weep tender tears of love that anything can taste so good. He also taught me about using anchovies to flavour lamb which i am very greatful for.

pork is a meat that i'm kind of picky about, just because my mom dries it out horribly when she cooks it, and i can't get it right either (and haven't tried a whole lot to perfect that) so really, this would be awesome to be able to sit in on. and anchovies as a flavoring for lamb? how does that work?

>but she does make the best bolognaise (though with my recent additions to my recipe i might have caught up with her).

what is bolognaise?


thanks so much for helping with my field research!


 
ifihadahif Posted: Fri Dec 4 20:27:54 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Bolognese is awesome !
I found this recipe for you.
http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/pasta-bolognese

I had an aunt from Wales and she made Yorkeshire pudding that was wonderful.
I sure do miss her, may she rest in peace.


 
Puck Posted: Tue Dec 8 14:29:48 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  I said:
>veggies of choice -
butternut squash or sweet potato work well too

My PB&J-
Toasted or waffles
Peanut Butter
Pumpkin Butter
Dried Cranberries
bee pollen

My OM NOM has a first name! It's OM NOM NOM NOM NOM!


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Sat Dec 12 19:06:27 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  hey everybody, i just wanted to let you all know i turned in my paper this past monday...i think it will go over well! thank you for all your input and participation.. but don't feel like that should keep you from continuing to talk about food. :-)


 
Puck Posted: Sat Dec 12 19:25:18 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  *pushes her out of the way*

so, anyway the faux salisbury steak was a complete flop, figuratively and literally. Luckily, I'm still accustomed to eating from the cafeteria in hs, so I totally ate it.


 
ehwazingwaz Posted: Sun Dec 13 16:42:06 2009 Post | Quote in Reply  
  Puck said:
>*pushes her out of the way*


:-p


 



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